Local News Headlines

A Jamestown man was arrested last weekend on a number of warrants after officers on patrol spotted him and, chased him through several backyards....  

City police say they observed 22 year-old Mason Alexander at the corner of West Third and Jefferson Streets about 11:30 Saturday morning and, tried to make contact with him.  However, officers say Alexander took off and led them to an area of West Third and Jefferson Street when they caught him.  Police say he resisted arrest but, was taken to the city jail pending arraignment on a total of four warrants.  Alexander also faces new charges including obstructing governmental administration, and resisting arrest.

 
A Jamestown man wanted in both New York and Pennsylvania has turned himself into city police after a two-day search on Jamestown's eastside.....  

City Police Captain Bob Samuelson says they received several tips on the possible whereabouts of 47 year-old Todd Dellahoy, whose vehicle was spotted in the area of Willard Street and Willow Avenue this past Thursday afternoon.  Samuelson says Dellahoy turned himself into JPD investigators about 9 AM Saturday and, he was arrested for first-degree attempted arson.  He was arraigned and sent to the county jail without bail.  He's also sought on an unrelated warrant for Parole Violation in Pennsylvania. 


A gracious acceptance and some blunt observations accompanied the presentation of a major humanitarian award at the Robert H. Jackson Center in Jamestown last night....  

Irwin Cotler, Chair of the Raoul Wallenberg Centre for Human Rights and a former Justice Minister in Canada, said he was 'moved and humbled' to receive the Heintz Award for Humanitarian Achievement.  Cotler spoke of an increase in authoritarian regimes in the world and ticked off a list of places where atrocities have occurred or political prisoners have been held, including Syria and Saudia Arabia.  He said these situations are a 'looking glass' into resurgent authoritarianism, and a retreat of democracies.  Joshua Heintz, a former member of the Jackson Center board, created the award.  Last night's events opened the 13th annual International Humanitarian Roundtable.  The evening concluded with a presentation by 'world musician' Samite Mulongo.

The world's top international prosecutors have again assembled in Chautauqua County, but the gathering this year will have a different name and format....  

The annual International Humanitarian Law Dialogs are now called the "Humanitarian Law Roundtable..." and, it got underway yesterday at the Robert H. Jackson Center in Jamestown.  It continues today and tomorrow at Chautauqua Institution.  Former International prosecutor, and Jackson Center Director, Jim Johnson, who has been heavily involved in past programs, says today they'll begin the actual roundtable, then have break out groups this afternoon.

Johnson says the programs are all free to the public and, are very unique because these are the "movers and shakers" in the international criminal law and, are the one's who make it happen.  He adds they are the modern day Robert H. Jacksons.  Johnson says they are continuing his work after the Nuremburg War Crimes trials that followed World War-Two.  The founding prosecutors of the Law Dialogs will be on hand for Tuesday afternoon's program.


A new state law will take effect beginning in 2020 that will require all motorized watercraft operators complete a state-approved boating safety course.  Doug Hamernick of the U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary says Brianna's Law will be phased in over the next five years.....

The legislation, signed into law earlier this month by Governor Andrew Cuomo, is named after an 11-year-old Long Island girl who was killed in a boating accident in 2005.  Hamernick says a boater only needs to take the certificate course once and, it's good for life.  Hamernick says failure to comply with the law could result in a fine of between $100 and $250-dollars starting in January of 2020.

 
The latest weapon in the fight against invasive species is the sniffing power of dogs trained to find noxious weeds before they flower and spread seeds....  

The nonprofit New York-New Jersey Trail Conference has trained a Labrador retriever named Dia to find Scotch broom plants in two state parks 50 miles north of New York City.  The invasive shrub is widespread in the Pacific Northwest but new to New York, and land managers hope to eradicate it before it gets established.  Detection dogs have long been used to sniff out drugs, explosives and disaster survivors.  Now there's a growing number being trained to find targeted invasive plants so conservationists can uproot them.  Montana-based Working Dogs for Conservation is training dogs to find invasive insects and mussels as well as plants.


In New York state government news, Republican lawmakers aren't happy with Governor Andrew Cuomo's plan to charge motorists $25-dollars for new license plates......  

The Democratic governor recently announced a public vote to pick the plate's design, as well as plans to impose a $25 replacement fee on motorists with older plates.  Republican lawmakers - and some Democrats - call it a cash grab.  State Senate Republican leader John Flanagan says the state is trying to "nickel and dime" everyday New Yorkers.  Cuomo's administration defends the move, noting that more than 3-million New York plates are at least 10 years old.  Officials say aging plates can peel and rust.  That can decrease reflectivity and make it harder for police or traffic cameras to read the plates.


The Chief Clerk in Warren County, Pennsylvania has been given the state's Outstanding Chief Clerk/Administrative Award for this year....  

The County Commissioners in Warren say Pam Matve received the award at the County Commissioners Association of Pennsylvania's Annual Dinner in Reading earlier this month.  Officials say the award is given to county leaders and others who have enhanced the well-being of counties and residents.  The state association says Matve is the first Chief Clerk in the history of Warren County to receive such an award for “excelling in an ever-changing position, as well as invaluable support of programs related to courthouse reconstruction, information storage, workforce opportunities for persons with disabilities, and the county’s open records process.”  Matve calls it an "amazing honor."